Book Reviews Information

Book Review: Kiss, Bow, or Shake Hands {How To Do Business In Sixty Countries}


Kiss, Bow, Or Shake Hands: How To Do Business In Sixty Countries By Terri Morrison, Wayne A. Conaway, George A.

Pariah - Book Review


"Pariah, written by multi-talented artist and author Timothy Goodwin, is a science fiction, fantasy novel that incorporates some very clear ideas to what is wrong with today's world. The characters are colorfully portrayed and the battles were very well written.

Screenwriter and Novelist Marguerite Ashton Receives Rave Reviews for Mafia Novel


When asked what gave her the idea for the story, she replied, "I am a big movie fanatic of all genres, but if you were to ask my favorites, it would be mafia and horror. With Taylini, I decided to add a twist that is not included in your usual "mafia stories.

Book Review: What Color Is Your Parachute?


What Color is Your Parachute? Reviewed by: Matt Keegan © 2003, Matthew C. Keegan, LLCFinding a job today presents unique challenges that did not exist five years ago.

Ferns Dragon - Book Review


"Fern's Dragon is a wonderfully fun read that stimulates the imagination of both young people and the young-at-heart alike. It is a good mystery-fantasy story that is artfully composed.

Book Release: Ginas Poems - Adventures in Love


Book Release: Gina's Poems -- Adventures in Love Written & illustrated by Siegfried J. Heger ISBN 0-9763503-0-0 Perfect Bound, 72 pages, (8.

Looking for Harvey Weinstein Book Review


Brassy, ballsy and full of energy.A totem of two women's struggle to do something worthwhile in life, it certainly knows how to serve up endless comical observations.

Atlanta Pastor Releases Book Of Life


Local Atlanta Pastor known for his charity work such as feeding the homeless, at risk youth and giving toys to children at Christmas time is releasing his first book entitled "Diary OF A Shattered Spirit". Pastor Adams says that this book will address some of the struggles and stresses that plaque our society today.

Spiders Big Catch


When I was in college, Spider McGee, Charlie Fox, and I loved to fish off the log boom in the river near my house on summer afternoons. We'd sit and talk about life, drink hot chocolate, and occasionally catch a fish or two.

Putting it on Paper - Book Review


"Dawn Josephson, author of 14 books, has written a fantastic author resource with her latest book Putting it on Paper - The ground rules for creating promotional pieces that sell books. This book discusses the development and use of contents within a media kit, and other marketing materials.

Second Eden Book Review


"Carlton Austin has crafted a wonderful piece of work in Second Eden - an action-packed suspense thriller with a little romance and some elements of science fiction. Its beautifully designed cover incorporates gorgeous images depicting scenes within the plot and the book is available in both hard and soft cover.

Unspoken Dreams - Book Review


"Carol Bennett writes a stunning mystery-thriller. Her chilling entrance is one I have encountered only rarely in a book.

Star - Book Review


Tom Peters crafted a moving, educational animal adventure story in his novel Star. This is a dog-lover's fiction - written for a young adult audience.

Pausing To Catch My Breath - Book Review


"Debra Warren has appropriately titled her book of poetry 'Pausing to Catch My Breath'. The pages depict this mother and grandmother as someone who I would personally love to sit across from at a kitchen table with a huge pot of tea and talk for hours.

Book Review - As the Darkness Deepens by Michael Cale


Newton's Third Law of Motions states that "For ever action, there is an equal and opposite reaction." Michael Cale's latest novel, As the Darkness Deepens, is an interesting study in this universal law as it relates to the forces of good and evil.

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MORE RESOURCES:
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Year for 2017 is feminism. The word was a top lookup throughout the year, with several spikes that corresponded to various news reports and events.

In an opinion piece in the Irish Times, John Boyne writes:

So I'm going to make a claim now that will probably get me kicked out of the Fraternity of Underappreciated Male Authors (FUMA) and blacklisted from the annual Christmas football game. Here goes:

I think women are better novelists than men.

There, I've said it. While it's obviously an enormous generalisation, it's no more ludicrous than some half-wit proudly claiming never to read books by women. For the record, purporting to love literature while dismissing the work of female writers is like claiming to be passionate about music while refusing to listen to anything but Ed Sheeran. However, I'm going to try to back up my sweeping statement...

The great Simeon Booker, one of the bravest journalists of our time, faced dangers far worse than a petulant president's social media feed. Booker refused to be cowed--and ultimately helped change the nation. His life's work should be a lesson to us all about the power of truth to vanquish evil.

Booker died Sunday at 99. At the height of his career, few could have imagined he would live so long.

As Washington bureau chief for Chicago-based Johnson Publications, publisher of the newsweekly Jet and the monthly magazine Ebony, Booker went to the Deep South to cover the most tumultuous events of the civil rights movement--life-threatening work for an African American journalist.

William H. Gass, a proudly postmodern author who valued form and language more than literary conventions like plot and character and who had a broad influence on other experimental writers of the 1960s, '70s and beyond, died on Wednesday in St. Louis. He was 93. Mr. Gass was widely credited with coining the term "metafiction" to describe writing in which the author is part of the story. He himself was one of the form's foremost practitioners.

Barnes & Noble, which posted a wider loss last quarter and sent its shares tumbling, is scaling back ambitions to become more than a bookseller.

The retailer had hoped that toys, games and other items would shore up its results, especially as Amazon ate away at its traditional business. But its non-book sales have flagged the past two quarters, and now the company is putting its focus back firmly on reading.

Shelf Awareness reports on the growing "Cider Monday" movement by indie booksellers in response to the big online shopping day known as Cyber Monday. In this low key but fun event stores offer their customers "a warm welcome and a cup of delicious cider" to thank them for shopping local.

Dictionary.com's choice for its Word of the Year is "complicit." It says online searches for the word spiked three times this year...

On Saturday, hundreds of booksellers across the USA took part in Indies First and Small Business Saturday, organizing all kinds of in-store activities, offering a range of deals, hosting parties and engaging in the staple of Indies First since the event was founded by Sherman Alexie in 2013: having authors work in their favorite indies as booksellers. Shelf Awareness reports on some of the events.

Meanwhile, in the UK, bookstores celebrated the first inaugural Saturday Sanctuary to "celebrate bookshops as a place of calm and respite from our hectic daily lives."

A New York Times opinion piece by Daniel T. Willingham lays out the argument that American's poor reading skills cannot be blamed on modern technology but on a misunderstanding of how the mind reads - that functional literary is grounded not just in the ability to read words but in having the factual knowledge to put what one is reading into context.

According to Barnes & Noble's survey, 77% of Americans read at least one book, newspaper or magazine during Thanksgiving or other holiday travel, while 60% of travelers usually bring, buy or borrow reading material specifically for travel on Thanksgiving Eve. Some 73% of respondents said they felt that traveling on the day before Thanksgiving is a "good time to bring a book they would enjoy and be able to read," and just over a quarter of Americans feel that "bringing a book along for Thanksgiving could give them a way to get out of an uncomfortable or awkward conversation with a relative or other guest."

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