Do You Know How to Buy and Read eBooks!

Now, I know what you're probably thinking, "Reading and eBook is just like reading an ordinary book." I disagree. Here's way, If you're here reading this article then I'm pretty sure you've read your fair share of eBooks, and most likely most of those eBooks were on the topic of internet marketing, making money from home, home based business opportunities, and on and on right? The reason that eBooks are ready differently than your normal novel is because of the way they are sold.

Here's what I mean? When you go to Borders to and pick up your favorite mystery novel you you're not given a hard sell on the benefits of buying that mystery novel right before you make the decision to buy or not. At a book store, you buy a book because you decide you want it or YOU decide you need it for some particular task. No big promises are made as to the results that you will after you learn the books "hidden secrets", so you take the book at face value.

Now, things are totally different when you buy an eBook. So, let me go through the steps and the psychology that I used to go through when I bought an eBook. I think you might find some this pretty familiar?

First I would happen across the sales page through some link, usually while searching for some sort of information that can help me earn money online. Then, I was hit with a powerful headline that says "Do XYZ after learning my SECRET and YOU to can make $1,000,000 TODAY!" I'd stop and say hmm? that sounds interesting let me read a little more about this secret to see if I can figure out what it is.

Next, I'd get sucked into the sales page which would take me on an emotional rollercoaster which left me a burning desire to know what this author's secret is and led me to believe that I couldn't live without this information. I would then ponder on the idea of making $1,000,000 today and ask myself "what if this information really will make me rich how much would it be worth?"

At this point I'd consider paying for the secrets, but only if the price was right. So, I start looking for the sales price which is always hidden deep in the sales page somewhere where you can never find to decide whether or not I was going to buy it (Finding the price of an eBook is kind of like playing "Where's Waldo?" you know it's there somewhere but you just can figure out where. )

When I finally found it, if the price was right I buy it. Then in a sort of nervous anxious rage I would download my new treasure and rip through it until I foundd the "secret" hidden deep within. When I did find the secret I was usually a little let down because it was either something that I probably could have figured out myself or it seemed to hard or it would take to long?. Then I threw the book aside until the next secret came along that struck my fancy.

Maybe this isn't exactly how you approach eBooks, but it is how quite a few people do. I hope you see the flaw in this sort of information acquisition. Most people, in my estimation, buy eBooks to find out the hidden secret within and not to actually learn and apply what's in the book. The sales prose on the sale page does such a good job at selling the person that they need to know that secret that that ends up being the major reason they purchase the information, That is most people don't buy eBooks as an information resource they are simple buying the secret. They rip through the eBook and when they find whatever secret it was they were looking for it's almost as if they are satisfied with that alone.

Please never do this! You will find yourself wasting a lot of money and put yourself on an expensive and frustrating emotional rollercoaster.


Here is the correct way to buy and read an eBook:


Only buy an eBook if you are sure that it is something that will absolutely help with your task at hand. For example, if your in the process of creating an affiliate website don't buy a eBook that will teach you how to create an opt-in list until the task at hand is completed. Buying extra information products will only confuse you and stop your forward progression in whatever task it is that you are currently doing if they are off subject.


When you do find supplemental information to help you with your task at hand save the sales page and wait a week before you buy the book. If you come back in a week and the you still feel the information will be extremely helpful purchase the book. (Tis is much easier said than done!)

? Tip: If the eBooks is on some sort of basic information there is usually a forum somewhere where you can ask an expert first hand your specific question and get real time valuable information for FREE. Try this first. You may be pleasantly surprised with what you learn.


When you do buy the eBook take it slow. Print it out. Pick up a highlighter and relax in your favorite easy chair. Take notes. Come up with your own and write down your broad takeaways. Then use the individual tips and strategies contained in the eBook one at a time. Track your results and trouble shoot.

That's it!

If you follow the three simples steps above you'll find yourself spending much less on eBooks and getting much more mileage out of those that you do buy. As a final word of advice, take eBooks at face value just like any other book and never buy an eBook just because you want to learn some secret and you'll be just fine.


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