My Dad Wears Polka-dotted Socks! - Review


"Bright colored sheets just inside the sturdy book cover certainly set the mood for this excellent book geared for children between the ages of 4 and 8.

The main character is a young boy who is desperately fretting over the class reaction to his strange family. He dreads the day the children in his classroom are due to present their portrayals of their families. Much to his delight, he realizes his family is not so strange after all. Parents and teachers will certainly find the yoga-loving dad with orange polka-dotted socks is sure to get the giggles rolling. The impressive illustrations hold attention to the page.

As youth, we are often fascinated by other family's doors and what lays beyond them. When we discover that all the quirks and differences reside in everyone's family, it makes it easier to accept our families and our place in them. This is a valuable life skill that would certainly help to ground little people at this age.

Educators and caretakers may find this book useful in social and family studies. Children are encouraged to personalize the book on the first page and create a list of their family and their personality traits on the last page - thus making this book more interactive."

ISBN#: 0974430722
Author: Kristin Joy Humes
Illustrations: Loel Barr
Publisher: Merry Lane Press

~ Lillian Brummet - Book Reviewer - Co-author of the book Trash Talk, a guide for anyone concerned about his or her impact on the environment Author of Towards Understanding, a collection of poetry.
www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit" target="_new">http://www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit


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