On the Brink of Risk - A Book You Wont Put Down


On the Brink of Risk is a fiction novel inspired in true events; it has a love story turned evil, hate and vengeance, intents to kill, negligence and malpractice at more than one hospital that almost lead to death, harassment and persecution by the political organizations and government officials as well as comments on everything the average citizen has to go through to endure everyday life in that Caribbean country.

It was written under the pseudonym of Nancy Cruz and writing was at first an intent to make a catharsis and finally put to rest everything that had been a load in the author's mind and life for too many years, she thought that was the only way to really start anew.

But after writing it she realized that it also carries a message. Many people around the world face an illness such as cancer and think that it is the end of the world for them, she survived it three times but that was the result of having faith, of being perseverant , of not sitting back at home when so many doctors told her she had nothing at all, of going from one doctor to another until finally one made the right diagnosis.Cancer is a menace, that's true, but anyone can make it if the right thing is done at the right time. In another aspect too many women go silently through what she went and accept it all, her story should tell them that they have to stand up for themselves, fight for themselves and their children because they deserve a quiet and happy life.

In the story Monika's husband talks the psychiatrist he had convinced her to see into giving her electroshocks so that she would forget the man who was her soul mate and had left behind to move back with him to protect her son's health. She forgot complete chapters of her life, forgot skills she had...but not that man! And anyway, standing up for herself and her children, knowing that she had the right to be herself and not a puppet, finally divorced him as soon as her son's health allowed it!

So you see how many healthy messages the book has! Don't forget them....you too deserve to be happy!

I'm an Accountant and a Bilingual Commercial Secretary graduated from an American College and University; a writer, songwriter, actress and singer. I am also a Translator/Interpreter.

I started to write short stories when I was 9 years old, my mother took charge of having them published in magazines. I sang opperettas and pop music on radio and TV when I was a teenager. I got married when I was 20 years old, have a son and a daughter and got divorced when I was 34 years old. I spent two years acting, performing main characters on theatres when I separated from my husband although I've been writing songs for 5 years by then. I went back on stage to sing when I was over 50 and did it with a high level of acceptance in three of the most prestigious night clubs of my country. I survived cancer 3 times, suffered harassment and persecution from political and government organizations and was on the brink of going to jail. That's why I live in Canada now. After the political changes in my country I was never able to publish anything but I was a member of the songwriters association.


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In a decision handed down by the U.S. Trade Representative Tuesday morning, Bibles and other religious books were not included on the first list of products imported from China that would be subjected to 10% tariffs starting September 1. Bible publishers were especially worried about the possibility of tariffs on Bibles made in China, since few printers outside of China have the capability of manufacturing Bibles.

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The release of the four books—The Catcher in the Rye, Nine Stories, Franny and Zooey, and Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour—An Introduction—in e-book editions (with new cover designs) marks a continuing year-long centennial celebration of Salinger's acclaimed works of fiction.

A JRR Tolkien expert working on Amazon's forthcoming multi-series adaptation of Tolkien's work has claimed that Amazon has been refused permission by the estate to use the bulk of the plot from The Lord of the Rings in their $1bn adaptation (predicted to start production in 2020).

Tolkien scholar Tom Shippey, who is supervising the show's development, told German fansite Deutsche Tolkien that the estate has refused to allow the series to be set during any period other than the Second Age of Middle-earth. This means Amazon's adaptation will not cross over at all with events from the Third Age, which were dramatised in Peter Jackson's Oscar-winning trilogy in which the hobbit Frodo Baggins journeys to destroy the One Ring.

Spanning 3,441 years, the Second Age begins after the banishment of the dark lord Morgoth and ends with the first demise of Sauron, Morgoth's servant and the primary villain in The Lord of the Rings, at the hands of an alliance of elves and men.

In The Washington Post, eight black women share their thoughts on the life and work of Toni Morrison, including Michelle Obama:

"..For me and for so many others, Toni Morrison was that first crack in the levee — the one who freed the truth about black lives, sending it rushing out into the world. She showed us the beauty in being our full selves, the necessity of embracing our complications and contradictions. And she didn't just give us permission to share our own stories; she underlined our responsibility to do so. She showed how incomplete the world's narrative was without ours in it..."

Elliott Advisors has completed its purchase of Barnes & Noble. The acquisition was officially completed when more than 81% of B&N's shares were tendered by the August 6 deadline.

As a result of the deal, B&N becomes a private company controlled by the private equity firm Elliott Advisors, which also owns the U.K. bookstore chain Waterstones. As a result of the acquisition, for which Elliott paid $6.50 per share in a deal valued at $683 million, James Daunt, head of Waterstones, will run both the U.K. chain and B&N. B&N founder Len Riggio will have no formal role in company.

Toni Morrison, the 1993 Nobel laureate in literature, whose acclaimed, best-selling work explored black identity in America and in particular the experience of black women, died on Monday in the Bronx. She was 88.

Her death, at Montefiore Medical Center, was announced by her publisher, Alfred A. Knopf. A spokeswoman said the cause was complications of pneumonia. Ms. Morrison lived in Grand View-on-Hudson, N.Y.

President Trump announced yesterday afternoon that he is prepared to impose 10% tariffs on $300 billion worth of goods imported from China in retaliation for what he views as China's failure to follow through on promises to buy more agricultural products from the U.S. and to stop the flow of Fentanyl into the country. The tariffs would be imposed on September 1, and would cover a wide range of consumer products, including virtually all books.

The new tariff threat comes a little more than a month after Trump suspended plans to place 25% tariffs on the same group of products (referred to by the U.S. Trade Representative as List 4) after trade talks with China resumed...

The author of a bestselling Christian guide to relationships for young people has announced that his marriage is over and he has lost his faith.

Joshua Harris, whose biblical guide to relationships I Kissed Dating Goodbye sold nearly 1m copies around the world after it was published in 1997, has also apologized to LGBT+ people for contributing to a "culture of exclusion and bigotry".

Colin A. Palmer, a historian who broadened the understanding of the African diaspora, showing that the American slave trade was only one part of a phenomenon that spanned centuries and influenced cultures worldwide, died on June 20 in Kingston, Jamaica. He was 75.

More than a year after imposing a controversial four month "test" embargo on new release e-books in libraries from its Tor imprint, Macmillan announced today that it will now impose a two month embargo on library e-books across all of the company's imprints.

Under the publisher's new digital terms of sale for libraries, "library systems" will be now be allowed to purchase a single—that is, one—perpetual access e-book during the first eight weeks of publication for each new Macmillan release, at half price ($30). Additional copies will then be available at full price (generally $60 for new releases) after the eight-week window has passed. All other terms remain the same...

Macmillan is now the fourth Big Five publisher to change its terms for digital content in libraries in recent months—but its changes, and the views expressed by Macmillan CEO John Sargent, are by far the most unique and contentious of the group. In a July 25 memo (addressed to authors, illustrators, and agents), Sargent not only delivered the news of Macmillan's library e-book changes, he basically called out libraries for depressing author payments...

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