Her Backyard: Book Review


Her Backyard by Doreen Lewis is an adventure, romance novel that depicts a career woman in the middle of self-discovery. It is about making choices that may not be so easy to make and complex relationships between co-workers, siblings and friends. I am certain that many readers within the age group between 30 and 40 will find a connection with Audrey, the main character.

Audrey and her sister Ava have a touching, close - sometimes tense, other times humorous - relationship. Their mother died when they were young and now they were facing losing their beloved father. Audrey returns home for the funeral and meets up with an old flame that helps her come to terms with what is missing in her life. Office politics were wearing thin and career hungry co-workers were beginning to both irritate and consume her.

She begins to question her choices in life and is faced with desirable options that play tug-of-war with her mind. Finally, exhausted and emotionally wrought she is given the opportunity to choose the path of content happiness. Audrey learns to make a decision based upon her needs, rather than trying to live up to the impossible lifestyle society encourages.

Her Backyard definitely has a story line that I think many women can relate with. Career women have to make many sacrifices and there are times when one wonders if this lifestyle is truly full filling all their needs. I think Doreen Lewis has written a fine book portraying this conundrum.

ISBN#: 0976091941
Author: Doreen Lewis
Publisher: Helm Publishing

~ Lillian Brummet - Book Reviewer - Co-author of the book Trash Talk, a guide for anyone concerned about his or her impact on the environment ­ Author of Towards Understanding, a collection of poetry.
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