The Storyteller, Volume I - A Must Read Book


The Storyteller
New Book Offers Supernatural Tales Involving Everyday People

Martha Whittington invites readers to take a break from the doldrums of daily routine and delve into a world where ordinary lives are blindsided by the bizarre. The Storyteller: Volume I (now available through AuthorHouse) provides a feast of paranormal delights that satisfy the imagination. Comprised of six intriguing tales, The Storyteller delves into the lives of a colorful variety of people who suddenly find themselves in unsettling situations. In "The Fennigan Case," two news reporters step across the threshold of a creepy house and into another dimension. "A Unique Team" follows another investigative journalist as he plunges into international intrigue. Readers explore the mind of a psychic teenager in "The Hidden Knowledge" and meet a wicked woman who holds an entire town hostage with her dark magic in "The Witch". Two brothers endure tragedy in a remote corner of the world in "Sand," and a couple experiences any parent's worst nightmare in "The Gifted Child". Throughout The Storyteller, Whittington weaves a macabre tapestry of drama, suspense and fast-paced action. From the dangers of the Egyptian desert to the cold streets of New York, she takes readers on a thrilling journey along the knife- edge between this world and the unknown. A captivating read for fans of the disturbingly weird. The Storyteller delivers thrills and chills at each turn of the page.

For further review on this book, please go to: storytellersbookclub.com">http://storytellersbookclub.com or e- mail us at: thestorytellers2121@yahoo.com

Born and raised in Monterrey, Mexico, Whittington set out to see the world when she was 21. She holds a Degree in Communications and a Master's in Public Relations, and she speaks fluent Spanish, English, German and French. Whittington comes from a family of published authors. At a young age, she wrote short stories that won awards in international contests. She currently lives in Houston, where she continues to nurture her passion for writing.


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