Review: eBook Secrets Exposed


If you want to make a lot of money with your own eBookand you only read one book on the subject in the next12 months, I strongly recommend that it's 'eBookSecrets Exposed' by Jim Edwards and David Garfinkel.

The authors are both well qualified in this area. JimEdwards has written five best-selling eBooks(including 'The Lazy Man's Guide to Online Business' and'33 Days To Online Success').

David Garfinkel is considered by many to be theworld's greatest copyrighting coach. He's anaward-winning business journalist and is also theauthor of several best-selling eBooks, such as'Advertising Headlines That Make You Rich' and 'KillerCopy Tactics'.

There have been so many books on this subject that Ireally couldn't imagine how this book could addanything new.

But I have never before seen an eBook that explainsso clearly how to do it. I got the feeling that you couldliterally walk in Jim Edwards' footsteps and get thesame results he did (over 4,500 eBook sales in 9 months).

What makes this book very readable and enjoyable is thatit's simply a long interview - David Garfinkel asksthe questions and Jim Edwards gives the answers.

The book is packed with so many 'insider tips' that'sit's difficult to know where to begin, but one of themost valuable tips is how to find out - before youwrite your book - if there's a market for it.

You do this by following Jim Edwards' 5-Step 'UltimateeBook Success Formula'. The formula allows you to findout if there's a target audience that is alreadyactively looking for the information you're about tosell online. And if so, if they are prepared to payfor it.

One of the interesting things you'll discover in thisbook is that competition is actually good for youreBook.

If you come up with an idea for an eBook and you findthat there are no competing books, you need to getworried - it means there's probably no market for thatidea.

But if there are books competing with yours, you're onsafe ground - you know you have a market.

And don't be put off by competition: anyone who isserious about a particular subject will buy at least 4or 5 books on that topic.

Many eBook authors who make big money quickly withtheir eBooks do resale rights. Instead of making $29per sale, they're making $99 per sale. As you can see,resale rights can get you into serious money veryfast.

But there are definite pitfalls with resale rights(such as finding out a few months later that yourcherished information product has become a freeeBook). If you want to avoid these pitfalls, you needto read Section 2 carefully.

You might think that best-selling eBook authors don'tbother with affiliate programs. Wrong!

Jim Edwards shows you that one of secrets to makingmoney with your eBook is to load it up with back-endaffiliate links. But there's a right way to do this anda wrong way (more about this in Section 5).

But the real secret to how Jim Edwards made over$40,000 in one month from a single eBook is jointventures - finding people with lists of 10,000 or even100,000 and getting them to do a personalrecommendation to their readers.

On the Internet it's not products that make money,it's lists (products don't sell, lists do). Or as JimEdwards puts it: 'the power is in the pipes, in thedistribution'.

Let's say your eBook is priced at $29 and you findsomeone with a list of 10,000 and they do a mailingthat results in 3000 people turning up at yourwebsite.

And let's say that those 3000 visits result in 90 to 180sales - you and your joint venture partner are suddenlymaking thousands of dollars in a few days.

Jim Edwards shows you exactly, step-by-step, how toset up a joint venture. He even shows you the exactsame letter that he used to set up joint ventures forhis book 'How To Write and Publish Your Own eBook in alittle as 7 Days'.

One of the keys to making joint ventures work is whatJim Edwards calls 'the Santa Claus technique' (more onthat in Section 2).

A question many people have is how to price theireBook. And it's crucial that you get this right. InSection 4 Jim Edwards reveals his 'pricing formula' -a very clever way to find your eBook's 'breakpoint' orequilibrium.

There's another very valuable tip in Section 17 - 'MySecret Method For Slashing Refunds' (this tip on it'sown could be worth the price of the whole book).

This is the best book on eBook publishing I've read inthe last 18 months - in fact, while reading it, I cameup with the idea for my next eBook!

You can get your copy of 'eBook Secrets Exposed' at:http://www.freezineweb.com/ese.html

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Michael Southon has been writing for the Internet for over 3
years. He has shown hundreds of webmasters how to use this
simple technique to build a successful online business. Click
here to find out more: ezine-writer.com/">http://ezine-writer.com/
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Prolific author William E. Butterworth III, who wrote under the name W.E.B. Griffin, has died aged 89.

The writer Andrea Levy, who explored the experience of Jamaican British people in a series of novels over 20 years has died, aged 62, from cancer.

After starting to write as a hobby in her early 30s, Levy published three novels in the 1990s that brought her positive reviews and steady sales. But her fourth novel, Small Island, launched her into the literary big league, winning the 2004 Orange prize, the Whitbread book of the year and the Commonwealth Writers' prize, selling more than 1m copies around the world and inspiring a 2009 BBC adaptation.

Betty Ballantine, half of a groundbreaking husband-and-wife publishing team that helped invent the modern paperback and vastly expand the market for science fiction and other genres through such blockbusters as "The Hobbit" and "Fahrenheit 451," has died aged 99.

She was just 20 and attending school in England, in 1939, when she met and married 23-year-old Ian Ballantine, an American at the London School of Economics. Using a $500 wedding gift from Betty's father, the Ballantines started out as importers of Penguin paperbacks from England and founded two enduring imprints: Bantam Books and Ballantine Books, both now part of Penguin Random House.

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The New York Times reviewer wrote: "Rosamunde Pilcher, where have you been all my life?" It sat in the bestseller list for 49 weeks in hardback and then tipped Tom Wolfe off the No 1 spot in paperback. The Shell Seekers was translated into more than 40 languages, selling around 10m copies.

Pilcher, who has died aged 94, wrote completely absorbing page-turners, taking what was called "romantic fiction" to an altogether higher, wittier level...

Dan Mallory, who writes under the name A. J. Finn, went to No. 1 with his début thriller, "The Woman in the Window." His life contains even stranger twists.

JD Salinger's son has confirmed for the first time that the late author of The Catcher in the Rye wrote a significant amount of work that has never been seen, and that he and his father's widow are "going as fast as we freaking can" to get it ready for publication.

Salinger died in 2010, leaving behind a small but perfectly formed body of published work that has not been added to since 1965's New Yorker story, "Hapworth 16, 1924." Rumors have circulated for years that the creator of one of the 20th century's most enduring characters, Holden Caulfield, continued to write over the ensuing decades he spent in the New Hampshire village of Cornish, far from public view.

In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, his son Matt Salinger has finally revealed, definitively, that his father never stopped writing and that "all of what he wrote will at some point be shared."

One of the biggest stars to come out of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, last week wasn't a CEO or a head of state or a venture capitalist. It was Rutger Bregman, a Dutch journalist and historian, who used his speaking time at the conference to lambaste the rich attendees for failing to talk about the one thing we know could fight wealth inequality: raising taxes for the kind of people who go to Davos.

The winner of Australia's richest literary prize did not attend the ceremony. His absence was not by choice.

Behrouz Boochani, whose debut book won both the Aus$25,000 non-fiction prize at the Victorian premier's literary awards and the Aus$100,000 Victorian prize for literature on Thursday night, is not allowed into Australia.

The Kurdish Iranian writer is an asylum seeker who has been kept in purgatory on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea for almost six years, first behind the wire of the Australian offshore detention centre, and then in alternative accommodation on the island.

Now his book No Friend But the Mountains – composed one text message at a time from within the detention centre – has been recognised by a government from the same country that denied him access and locked him up.

The Cut Out Girl by Bart van Es has won the overall Costa Book Award, with the judges declaring it, "the hidden gem of the year."

This biography tells the true story of a young Jewish girl in Holland during World War II, who hides from the Nazis in the homes of an underground network of foster families, one of them the author's grandparents.

Steve Cavendish, a former editor of the Nashville Scene and Washington City Paper, writes about the dire state of local newspapers, and his hopes that his new venture, to relaunch the Nashville Banner online as a nonprofit, will provide a model that will revitalize local media:

Wednesday was a bloodbath for journalists. BuzzFeed said it would lay off 15 percent of its employees, and Verizon Media announced it would cut 7 percent from its newsrooms at HuffPost, AOL and Yahoo. Worst of all, a wave of layoffs tore through Gannett newsrooms across the country that day, hitting staffs that had already been thinned by years of nearly annual cuts. In December, Gannett's USA Today Network president, Maribel Wadsworth, told her employees that the nation's largest-circulation newspaper chain "will be a smaller company" in the future and, well, the future is now. Wadsworth is facing a lot of pressures: Print revenue is down, digital and mobile revenue aren't nearly enough, and now a hedge fund promising even deeper cuts wants to acquire the company. If the future of corporate news operations looks bleak, that's because it is.

In Tennessee, we've been watching the slow-motion destruction of our news institutions under Gannett for a few decades now, and the idea that things are about to get even worse is appalling. As badly as the country needs strong coverage of national news these days, the local news landscape is important, too. And what happened here mirrors what's already happened in city after city.

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