Sorat and the Modern Day Evil


"Sorat's evil will be spread by his infernal army of soulless followers, willing to give their lives for his pleasure in subjecting mankind to horror of the ultimate magnitude."

The above mentioned quote summarizes one of the main themes in Hearne's political thriller, "Hulagu's Web". The book suggests that much of the horror, destruction and mayhem that happen in the contemporary world are explained by the endeavors of Sorat, Lucifer's terrifying accomplice. It is said that Sorat incarnates every 666 years. 1998 would therefore be the year of his last manifestation. Coincidently, it is the same year that Usama Bin Ladin and his associates publicly declared their Jihad against the West with blatant orders such as "We - with Allah's help - call on every Muslim who believes in Allah and wishes to be rewarded to comply with Allah's order to kill the Americans and plunder their money wherever and whenever they find it."

In his "Book of Revelation and the Work of the Priest", Rudolf Steiner describes Abaddon's attack on humanity. Abaddon (translated 'destroyer') is a demonic being born out of the abyss to lead an army of locusts with human-like faces. Rudolf Steiner explains the occult significance of this picture by suggesting that Abaddon's army consists of human beings who have been completely deprived of their ego. Sorat can rule on Earth by populating the empty shells of such people with the spirits that serve him. This infernal army would subject mankind to trials compared to which all the horrors of the twentieth century would pale. Coincidently again, Abaddon is referred to in Revelation 9-11, the same date that is now synonymous with the destruction of the twin towers and the attack on the pentagon.

Sorat is described as the strongest power against good. To accomplish his desire of destroying the earth, Sorat would manifest his evil in the social evolution. The wars and mass murders of our time are evidence of his corruption.

The fanatism and the everyday hatred of man against man are evils often disguised as religious dedication and nationalism. Sorat would bend people to his will by using the influence of leaders, be them political or religious. Sorat's alleged power lies in the ability to make followers believe that what they do for their fanatic leaders is right. As David J. Hearne says "the goal of this demon is to strip humans of their souls, egos and all goodness." Sorat could make horrible acts virtually impossible to eradicate once people become unable to recognize actions as evil.

The video of a hostage being beheaded in Iraq is an example of the horror mankind is subject to. It shows how much influence such a leader can have over others. He would stay back from his disciples, as he directs them to behead the hostage. Whenever the men holding the prisoner looked uncertain, the leader would convince them that what they were doing was the just thing. The scene appears to be a struggle between the leader (persuading) and the followers (resisting). The film shows how the power of evil can pervert people's senses to such a degree that destruction and horror replace the goodness and compassion in their souls.

The seductive powers of darkness act by using people's vulnerability and weaknesses against them. Terrorists claim their actions are for their love of God. Most of them believe that what they are doing is right. Someone who they see as a prophet or a messenger leads them to believe that they act in God's will. This messenger is trusted and considered more important than their own lives. Sorat would exploit these people to "give their lives for his pleasure in subjecting mankind to horror of the ultimate magnitude," as mentioned in Hulagu's Web.

It is difficult to understand why well-intentioned, logically thinking people fall into such traps. How can one induce another to become a suicide bomber willing to die for some obscure cause and kill other innocent people? How can the human mind become so clouded and susceptible to such evil and debasing acts? The answer lies in the fact that many people need something or someone to believe in. Sorat and his progeny would use this weakness to lead those susceptible to their influence. The reasons for their acts are masked, people follow because they need to believe and fail to ask themselves a rational explanation for what they are made to do. Nevertheless, if people saw the true intentions behind these schemes they would not follow. Evil exists as long it disguises itself.

Sorat could only maintain his power by distorting the way people perceive what is good. He would reduce each individual to his level - an entity without soul or conscious. His ultimate objective is to alter the human existence by spreading destruction and misery. Eradicating mercy, benevolence, compassion and humanity (most needed qualities that Christ himself advocated) is the only way Sorat can achieve his goals.

Becherete Adrian (is currently studying management marketing...) believes in the unlimited potential of the human mind and that constant evolution is impossible without striving to understand reality and distinguishing between the meanings of good and evil.


MORE RESOURCES:
Amazon is considering opening as many as 3,000 AmazonGo cashierless stores over the next few years, Bloomberg reported yesterday, calling it "an aggressive and costly expansion that would threaten convenience chains like 7-Eleven Inc., quick-service sandwich shops like Subway and Panera Bread, and mom-and-pop pizzerias and taco trucks."

Judges have unveiled their finalists for the 2018 Man Booker Prize on Thursday, whittling the prestigious fiction award's possible winners to a shortlist of just half a dozen novels: Anna Burns' Milkman, Esi Edugyan's Washington Black, Daisy Johnson's Everything Under, Rachel Kushner's The Mars Room, Richard Powers' The Overstory, and Robin Robertson's The Long Take.

Ian Buruma, the editor of The New York Review of Books, left his position on Wednesday amid an uproar over the magazine's publication of an essay by a disgraced Canadian radio broadcaster who had been accused of sexually assaulting women.

The essay's author, Jian Ghomeshi, who was acquitted of sexual assault charges in 2016, lamented his status as a pariah, "constantly competing with a villainous version of myself online."

It caused immediate furor, with some criticizing what they saw as a self-pitying tone, and soft pedaling of the accusations, which included slapping and choking, and had come from more than 20 women, rather than "several," as Mr. Ghomeshi wrote.

A number of publishers, most of them university presses, are taking Target Corporation to task for redacting certain key words in the product descriptions of their books. They say the Minneapolis-based chain retailer has scrubbed certain words from their descriptions, including "transgender," "queer," and even the term "Nazi."

In celebration of its 150th anniversary year, across the USA groups are holding Little Women-themed exhibits, conferences and lectures. Penguin Classics recently published a fetching new annotated edition, with a foreword by the singer/writer Patti Smith, one of the book's vast army of admirers... A new film is in the works, directed by Greta Gerwig and starring Emma Watson, Meryl Streep, Timothée Chalamet, Saoirse Ronan and Laura Dern, right on the heels of a BBC mini-series last year.

Across the capital and around the country, booksellers reported brisk sales of Bob Woodward's Fear on its first day on the shelves. The title now has 1 million copies in print, according to its publisher, Simon & Schuster, which added that a total of 750,000 copies were sold through the day of publication alone. (The combined sales figure includes pre-orders and first day sales of print books, e-books, and audiobooks in all formats.)

The Barnes & Noble roller-coaster ride continued last Friday, when the company's stock, which had dropped 8% the day before after another disappointing quarterly report, jumped 16.5%, to $5.30, on more than triple the usual volume. The cause: several pieces of news that suggested the company could be the subject of a takeover offer.

UK bookstore chain Waterstones is buying the 115 year-old family-owned chain Foyles, saying the deal will help to "champion" real bookshops in the face of online rivals.

The sale includes Foyles' well-known Charing Cross Road store in central London, which was relocated to larger premises in 2014.

Neil Gaiman and Haruki Murakami have been shortlisted for a substitute Nobel literature prize, created by cultural figures in Sweden after the Academy, rocked by a sexual assault scandal, was forced to postpone the awarding of 2018's prize.

The New Academy Prize was established, "to warrant that an international literary prize will be awarded in 2018, but also as a reminder that literature should be associated with democracy, openness, empathy and respect," the organisers said.

With 'bookstagramming' becoming a force in marketing, are designers making covers more colourful, bolder and cleaner, to stand out on our screens?...

thatware.org ©